7/14/2015

Studying the ways of water ...

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A few experiments from my last diving session with paper
These entailed using several varieties of watercolor & printmaker's paper;
frozen and fresh gleanings from the garden & hedgerow;
a steam bath, an onion bath, a mixed willow bath
and another that bordered on sage green;
alum pre-mordanting;
iron dipping & not iron dipping,
wrapping around pipes & layering between tiles.


The language of plants on cloth is certainly related to paper.  But not distantly,
like a 3rd cousin of your brother-in-law ... much closer, like siblings
who just don't live in the same state.
Water seems to me to be their shared vehicle
and I find it utterly fascinating how the exact same leaves can print
one way on cloth and another way altogether on paper.

: : :

"You don't have to be fully formed to get started on your work.  If that were true no one would ever start anything. But we live in a society were everyone wants to be a superstar and often find it difficult to be a beginner.  Think of all the great people and of their amazing journeys to reach the tops of their profession.  They were beginners who took action."

An inspiring quote by Terry Jarrard-Dimond
from her blog post,  Act On Your Ideas


18 comments:

  1. Cloth and paper are made of different stuff. Which goes some way toward explaining different results. Bear in mind that the more salts (ie alum) you add to the mix, the more likely the paper is to be compromised in the long term. If on the other hand you have no need for your work to outlive you (I have no need for that myself) then it doesn't matter :-)

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    1. Nope, don't have that need ... so it doesn't matter to me either. Would rather attract as much color from the glorious plants as poss. Alum made sense to me, seeing as how it's highly recommended for cloth made of cotton, linen, hemp etc and when my comparison tests turned out so extraordinary, well, that was it. Very much appreciate the tip tho. Wouldn't even be at this juncture if it weren't for you ;>)

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  2. These colors and patterns are heart arrestingly beautiful. How will you use them?

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    1. Dana, I'm so happy to have you visit here, neighbor!
      That's a most excellent question with no clear answer except
      I intend to PLAY. I've a lot of interest in mixing materials so I foresee these
      papers co-mingling. But first I am asking myself, what am I wanting to say
      with them? With mixing?

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  3. I was wondering how you would use them as well. They certainly are lovely and somehow intense comes to mind when looking for a way to describe my perception.
    Thanks for the link to Terry's blog. A very interesting and inspirational place to read.
    xx, Carol

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    1. As it's happened before between us, I'm thinking you've caught my wavelength, Carol.
      Terry's got some terrific things to say - so pleased you've visited over there.

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  4. I love the quote. I gives us 'permission' to play forever with no 'finished product' in mind. I think that's what creativity is all about. You achieved such beautiful results.

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    1. Me too, Penny - exactly so, about the permission. Especially good for me since I so rarely *finish* things ... seem to be perpetually in motion and I've begun to wonder if it isn't the process I'm in love with far more than a finished something or other. Or perhaps they really are finished when I leave them and they are not meant to be gone back to at all. For certainly, the pieces meant for finishing DO reach completion - the Solace flag, for instance.

      I'm wondering .... how often do you start one of your dolls & don't finish them? Would it be fair to call our unfinished works "sketches" ??

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  5. Lovely results and love the quote.

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  6. first seen you play with paper interesting experiment and colourfull as always i think paper are very difficult to work with , i have not find out yet how it works and examine all the time often surprising result but also very interesting

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    1. Yes, I think paper is tricky too, but like everything else ,familiarity brings a kind of understanding. That is what I'm striving for ;>)

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  7. Ahhhhh! Were this food I'd be screaming 'GET IN MA BELLY!' ... 'get in ma hands' doesn't sound as exciting though the sentiment isn't meant any less exuberantly!

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    1. You crackin' me up, Jen! Gonna give paper a try yourself? If only we weren't two countries apart ... think we'd be getting into some serious playtime trouble, don't you .......

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  8. The quote will always be actual....and your work will never end getting more beautiful

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    1. Many thanks for your kind words, yvette.

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  9. i've been reading backwards with much enjoyment, and reading india's note above. there is also to consider the chemistry involved in the various papers which takes place in the bowels of the mills...slurry (papermakers call it "stuff") chemistry, sizings, bleaches (or none) and where that fiber was grown and sourced and processed all have some influence over what your plants will do on their surfaces. i've used several papers extensively over several years, and surprises still delight me.

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    1. I reckon, Velma, we [all of us of a dyeing persuasion] shall see no end of pleasure as we carry on trying this, trying that. I used to be *in love* with making prints in the [photographic] darkroom in much the same way as I'm in love with this kind of printing now - and for a very similar reason: one never knew what was going to come from the "soup"! Joy. All of it. Heh, and thanks for peeking around my internet digs, hee hee.

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