6/23/2013

Wearing her flouncy June dress ...

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I really shouldn't be sitting here writing a post
when there is a mountain of work to be done out in the garden

but


it's a little rainy today and she was looking so nice in the subdued light,
I just had to make a record ... for posterity ... now, while the early summer blooms
are looking their best.
I'll want to remember the garden dressed up like this
when the January winds blow hard and long.

Hope for the future and all that ...

She's laden now, positively falling over with her big skirts,


spilling over the wall with self-seeded abandon,
filling every nook and cranny





offering up some feasting for the hummingbirds
and catmint landing platforms for the swallowtails.



I think there's still an arbor under there - but I dare you to try & make it through to the front door.
Gone a bit nutso, this shrub rose [when did THIS happen?] and she'll have to be
reined in for next season.  Still, something charming about 
this wild misbehavior ...



If you did make it through the arbor, you'd be be met with a frothy tangle  -  sweetly scented
Philadelphus scrambling through a purple-leaved Clematis recta ...

Oh June, you are a month of the sublime.
Thank you.



You are most definitely your own English rose



... no other month quite compares to you.










A few late afternoon rays help 'Night Owl' flaunt her petticoats.
And although I'm starting to feel terribly guilty about undone chores,
I feel so grateful for this abundance.


Sometimes you just have to stop and, well, you know ...






26 comments:

  1. Wonderful! You have a lot going on in your garden. Mine is just coming to life. Even the weed flowers are pretty right now. My husband wanted to pull out a vine with pretty purple flowers...a weed...Nope, at least not until its finished its blooms!

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    1. Lots of those sorts of *pretty weeds* hang around in my garden, too, Carol ... not always by my choice - HA! - although they do tend to get yanked out last, it seems.

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  2. wow...your garden is so beautiful. lots to take care of. fabulous images.

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    1. Back & creaky hands can attest to the "lots," Deanna.
      Thank you!

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  3. Christi, I adore what you do to your photos!

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    1. Oh Connie, thanks HEAPS for that ...

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  4. Your garden is utterly stunning! And those roses - my absolute favourites. Dreaming of the scents of rose and philadelphus...

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    1. ... kind of went a little wild for the David Austin English roses - they practically make me weep with their beauty.
      Many thanks.

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  5. Your garden is looking so beautiful. Things are still catching up here after our dreadful spring so it may be an abundant July this year.

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    1. I wish you much July abundance, Maggi!! You UK folks certainly deserve some bounty after the torrents.

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  6. Oh wow Christi! your garden is so wonderfully lush and fecundly wild and yourr photography is stunningly brilliant, thank you for taking this break from the chores!

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    1. Mo ... {{{ blushing }}}.
      Thank you for having a visit there with me ;>]]

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  7. I'm suffering from full-sun garden envy at the moment. What a beautiful garden!! Mine comes to life late in summer, its sweet now, but needs a long time to bloom tucked under the trees here.

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    1. Thank you so much, V, and I bet you have divine woodland ephemerals, and OH, those carpets of green velvet moss.
      "Grass is always greener" eh?

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  8. Replies
    1. Hi Morna, happy to see you 'round here ... thanks for the kind words.

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  9. Gorgeous and I'm about to look up 'Night Owl' now!

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    1. It only has a light scent, Fran, but it's a very strong rose (sturdy, upright canes), not too tall and the blooms are a gorgeous velvety-magenta red, in multiple clusters (much like the old-fashioned shrub roses). Very little blackspot & glossy deep green foliage. It's a keeper, for sure.

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  10. What a magical space! I don't believe you could get me back indoors with all of this going on in the garden -- a cup of tea, a good book and a bench would suit me quite well!

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    1. You got that right, Penny ~ I'm rarely inside this time of year, if the weather's halfway decent ;>]]
      Minus the tea & book tho ... more like clippers in one back pocket, gloves in the other, and the wheelbarrow filled with pruners & clippings. Truly, the work is endless, but I wanted to carve out my own little bit of nirvana from nothing and so I did. Worth every muscle ache it gives me.

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  11. I am having a visceral reaction to the beauty of the 'Night Owl'. I have never seen a more daunting colour. I'm wondering what they might produce in the dye pot......an invitation for freezing perhaps?

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    1. oooooh, busted ;>D Petal count growing in the freezer ...
      Last year I wrapped some in bundles but I'm positive I overcooked them ~ I lost the red. Trying again this season with gentler cooking temps, fingers crossed!

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  12. Replies
    1. You are so kind, thank you, Janice.

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  13. Oh, wow, what a gorgeous garden that looks so Pacific Northwest. Very cool owl statue, too. You make me almost want to move back to Oregon...almost.
    best, nadia

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    1. Not sure I'd leave where you are, Nadia!
      Owl moved with me from CA ... rode right behind the driver's seat wrapped in a towel for protection, almost nine years ago. He's grown quite the patina since then, even sporting a bit of lichen on the top of his hard head ;>]]

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